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Google makes Android 8.0 Oreo official, here’s everything new

iDownloadBlog - 13 min 48 sec ago

Released as a developer-only preview at Google’s annual conference back in March, the latest version of the Android operating system for smartphones, tablets and watches—officially called Android 8.0 Oreo—is now available through the Android Open Source Project.... Read the rest of this post here

"Google makes Android 8.0 Oreo official, here’s everything new" is an article by iDownloadBlog.com.
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Categories: Misc

Microsoft Outlines the Upgrade Procedures For Xbox One X

Slashdot - 23 min 34 sec ago
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: The easiest way to get all your games to the new system, as outlined by Microsoft Vice President Mike Ybarra, will be to just put them on an external USB hard drive and then plug that drive into the new console. "All your games are ready to play" immediately after this external hard drive move, he said, and user-specific settings can also be copied via external hard drive in the same way. If you don't have an external drive handy, "we're going to let you copy games and apps off your home network instead of having to manually move them or redownload them off the Internet," Ybarra said. It's unclear right now if Microsoft will mirror the PS4 Pro and allow this kind of system-to-system transfer using an Ethernet cable plugged directly into both consoles. For those who want to see as many pixels as possible as quickly as possible when they get their Xbox One X, Ybarra says you'll be able to download 4K updates for supported games before the Xbox One X is even available, then use those updates immediately after the system transfer. Microsoft also released a list of 118 current and upcoming games that will be optimized for the Xbox One X via updates, a big increase from the few dozens announced back at E3.

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Categories: Misc

We Survived

Balloon Juice - 35 min 15 sec ago

Here’s a time series of the eclipse as seen from Rochester – also had a bit of cloud cover at the end.

Open thread.

Categories: Politics

Alex Castellanos: Trump's Neo-Nazi Defense 'May Mean The End Of Trump Government'

Crooks and Liars - 38 min 33 sec ago

During ABC's THIS WEEK's round table discussion, Republican strategist Alex Castellanos, said that Trump's governing power has vanished.

Dab Balz, the Washington Post's chief correspondent said that among Trump's bad weeks, "this may be the worst that he's had."

"Whatever he thought he was doing Saturday, Monday, and Tuesday, with his varying statements, the judgment on him has been extremely harsh from fellow Republicans. And I think that really sums up the problem that he's had this week," Balz said.

Host Martha Raddatz then asked Alex, "So what does that really mean for him going forward?

Castellanos replied, "Well, it doesn't mean the end of the Trump presidency but it may mean the end of Trump government."

"It's going to be impossible for Donald Trump now to attract good people to government. And he hasn't filled out these positions that he needs to appoint. He has appointed about half of what Obama and Bush before him appointed at this point. It's going to be very hard for him to build his army to fight their army," Alex said.

Steve Bannon echoed similar sentiments while he was cleaning out his desk at the White house.

Yes, being an admitted neo-Nazi apologist who has no idea how to actually govern does have a down side.

Categories: Politics

WhatsApp announces new text-based status features

9to5Mac - 46 min 49 sec ago

Starting today, popular calling and messaging service WhatsApp is rolling out some new text-based status features for its iOS app and the web.

more…

Categories: Misc

Android O Is Now Officially Android Oreo

Slashdot - 1 hour 3 min ago
Android O is now officially going by the name of Android Oreo. The operating system is available today via Google's Android Open Source Project. OTA rollout is expected to arrive first to Pixel and Nexus devices, with builds currently in carrier testing. The Verge reports: The use of an existing brand makes sense for Google here -- there aren't a ton of good "O" dessert foods out there, and Oreos are pretty much as universally beloved as a cookie can be. There's also precedent for the partnership, as Google had previously teamed up with Nestle and Hershey's to call Android 4.4 KitKat.

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Categories: Misc

Video: iOS 11 beta 7 brings small changes and tweaks before widespread release this fall

iDownloadBlog - 1 hour 26 min ago

Apple today seeded a seventh beta of iOS 11 for iPhone and iPad to developers and public beta testers along with new betas of macOS High Sierra 10.13, watchOS 4 and tvOS 11.... Read the rest of this post here

"Video: iOS 11 beta 7 brings small changes and tweaks before widespread release this fall" is an article by iDownloadBlog.com.
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Categories: Misc

Does the World Need Polymaths?

Slashdot - 1 hour 43 min ago
Two hundred years ago, it was still possible for one person to be a leader in several different fields of inquiry. Today that is no longer the case. So is there a role in today's world for the polymath -- someone who knows a lot about a lot of things? From a report: Bobby Seagull's fist-pumping and natty dressing, and Eric Monkman's furrowed brow, flashing teeth, contorted facial expressions and vocal delivery -- like a fog horn with a hangover -- made these two young men the stars of the last University Challenge competition. [...] They're still recognised in the street. "People often ask me, do you intimidate people with your knowledge," says Monkman. "But the opposite is the case. I have wide knowledge but no deep expertise. I am intimidated by experts." Seagull, like Monkman, feels an intense pressure to specialise. They regard themselves as Jacks-of-all-Trades, without being master of one. "When I was young what I really wanted to do was know a lot about a lot," says Monkman. "Now I feel that if I want to make a novel contribution to society I need to know a great deal about one tiny thing." The belief that researchers need to specialise goes back at least two centuries. From the beginning of the 19th Century, research has primarily been the preserve of universities. Ever since, says Stefan Collini, Professor of Intellectual History and English Literature at Cambridge University, researchers have labels attached to them. "They're professor of this or that, and you get a much more self-conscious sense of the institutional divides between domains of knowledge."

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Categories: Misc

4K Apple TV codename referenced in tvOS 11 beta 7

9to5Mac - 1 hour 46 min ago

As Apple today released another round of beta updates for iOS, macOS, and tvOS, we’re hearing more details about the company’s upcoming products. This time, developer Guilherme Rambo has dug up information about the expected 4K Apple TV.

more…

Categories: Misc

Open Thread: When It Comes to Blotting Out the Sun…

Balloon Juice - 1 hour 51 min ago

(David Fitzsimmons via the The Arizona Daily Star)
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Speculation from last night…


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And not just Americans…

Let’s just hope Lord Smallgloves isn’t peeved enough to revert to Erik Prince’s ‘unlimited global grifting’ proposal…

Categories: Politics

KGI: Apple’s iPhone 8 ahead of Qualcomm with 3D sensing tech by 2 years

9to5Mac - 1 hour 55 min ago

In a new report out by KGI’s Ming-Chi Kuo, the group believes that Apple has a significant lead on Qualcomm in the 3D sensing technology space. KGI reports that Qualcomm won’t be making significant shipments until at least 2019.

more…

Categories: Misc

Google unveils Android 8.0 Oreo ahead of iOS 11/iPhone 8 launch

9to5Mac - 2 hours 34 sec ago

Google today unveiled the next version of its mobile operating system and its competitor to Apple’s iOS 11 with the official introduction of Android 8.0 ‘Oreo’. more…

Categories: Misc

Lunchtime Photo

Kevin Drum - 2 hours 12 min ago

We didn’t get a total eclipse here in Southern California, but that only lasts a couple of hours anyway. So why not visit this summer and enjoy our lovely beaches? You can spend days or weeks enjoying our golden sunshine. Doesn’t that really sound better?

Categories: Politics

Meeting and Hotel Booking Provider's Data Found in Public Amazon S3 Bucket

Slashdot - 2 hours 23 min ago
Leaks of personal and business information from unsecured Amazon S3 buckets are piling up. From a report: The latest belongs to Groupize, a Boston-area business that sells tools to manage small group meetings as well as a booking engine that handles hotel room-block reservations. Researchers at Kromtech Security found a publicly accessible bucket containing business and personal data, including contracts and agreements between hotels, customers and Groupize, Kromtech said. The data included some credit card payment authorization forms that contained full payment card information including expiration data and CVV code. The researchers said the database stored in S3 contained numerous folders, below; one called "documents" held close to 3,000 scanned contracts and agreements, while another called all_leads had more than 3,100 spreadsheets containing critical Groupize business data including earnings. There were 37 other folders in the bucket containing tens of thousands of files, most of them storing much more benign data.

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Categories: Misc

Donald Trump demonstrates the wrong way to watch an eclipse

Daily Kos - 2 hours 33 min ago

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Actually I’ve heard that white supremacists have much tougher eyes than normal people. So tough that they can look directly at the sun for hours. Hours and hours. So tough.

And it’s not as if the White House staff spends all their time covering up Trump’s craziness.

“You have no idea how much crazy stuff we kill”: The most common response centers on the urgent importance of having smart, sane people around Trump to fight his worst impulses. If they weren’t there, they say, we would have a trade war with China, massive deportations, and a government shutdown to force construction of a Southern wall.

Categories: Politics

Donald Trump Is An…Oh Forget It

Kevin Drum - 2 hours 36 min ago

Somehow, Donald Trump can always find a new way to be stupid. How does he do it?

Categories: Politics

Midday open thread: A ship found, a jumping car and a racist in the White House

Daily Kos - 2 hours 42 min ago
  • Today’s comic by Tom Tomorrow is Crisis of the week:
Cartoon by Tom Tomorrow - Crisis of the week
  • What you missed on Sunday Kos ...

A regional official in Spain says that the death toll in the attacks last week in Barcelona and a coastal town south of the city has risen to 15.

Catalan interior minister Joaquim Forn gave the updated figure in a news conference. He said that the new victim is a man found stabbed in a car. The car was believed to be used by one of the attackers to flee the scene.

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R) is no longer in the running for a job on a local sports talk show, he announced in a statement Sunday.

Christie auditioned for the post-gubernatorial gig as a co-host on WFAN’s morning show last month, during which he called a caller a “communist.”

For 72 years since the cruiser USS Indianapolis sank after being struck by Japanese torpedoes in the waning days of World War II, its exact resting place had been a mystery.

But a team of researchers led by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen now says they have positively identified the wreckage, 18,000 feet below the surface in the Philippine Sea. [...]

Indianapolis sank in just 12 minutes, with 300 of her crew going down with the ship. With few lifeboats, many of the remaining 900 faced death by exposure or shark attack until they were spotted three days later by a U.S. Navy patrol plane. By the time they were reached by rescuers, only 317 of the crew of 1,196 aboard were still alive.

A family heading to Cape May, New Jersey, found themselves in an improbable situation earlier this month when a drawbridge lifted right underneath their car and they were forced to jump the opening.

Terence Naphys, after paying the $1.50 toll at the Middle Thorofare Bridge that connects the Wildwoods and Cape May via Ocean Drive, was heading across the bridge when a steel metal grate suddenly lifted 3 to 6 feet underneath his car, Naphys told Lower Township police. [...]

The car landed on the other side of the bridge and the family was able to drive away without any injuries.

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On today’s Kagro in the Morning show: Happy eclipse! We’ve got more on the Confederate monument phenomenon, and a fascinating turn into some real lost Southern history. Also, an update on those alt-right idiots at sea, and the first post-mortems on Bannon’s “departure.”

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Categories: Politics

Being the First Name on the Ballot Has a Huge Effect

Kevin Drum - 2 hours 47 min ago

Here’s a fascinating bit of political science research. It’s a few months old, but I just recently found out about it. In Texas, names are placed on the ballot in different orders depending on the county. The order is selected randomly, which allows an examination of whether being first on the ballot matters very much. Darren Grant of Sam Houston State University did exactly that, and he found that it really, really makes a difference:

Across all twenty-four contests, the effect is invariably positive and, with two exceptions in runoff elections, statistically significant. The smallest effects are found in high-profile, high information races: the Republican primary for U.S. Senator, which featured the incumbent, John Cornyn; the governor’s race, which featured long-time Attorney General Greg Abbott; and Land Commissioner, which featured well-known political newcomer George P. Bush. In these races the ballot order effect is only one or two percentage points.

Larger estimates obtain for most “medium-profile, medium-information” races such as Comptroller, Railroad Commissioner, or the Democratic nominee for U.S. Senator. Most of these fall in a fairly tight band that ranges from three to five percentage points. Estimates are even larger in the low-profile, low-information judicial elections, generally ranging from seven to ten percentage points. Overall, the ballot order effect tends to be larger in contests that receive less attention and in which voters are likely to know less about the candidates on the ballot.

Here this is in colorful chart form:

In medium and low-profile races, the ballot order effect is big enough that it might decide races all by itself. Even in high-profile races, “one or two percentage points” can be a pretty big effect. There are plenty of races for governor or senator that have been won by less.

In states that don’t randomize ballot order, this means that the first candidate on the ballot has a huge advantage. And this could be true even in states that do. If you got lucky and ended up at the top of the ballot in Houston, Dallas, and San Antonio, you’d get an advantage in areas with millions of votes, while your opponent would get an advantage in areas with only thousands of votes. And there are certain unusual circumstances where the ballot order effect can be truly massive:

In an ironic twist of fate, we were recently able to [test our hypothesis] with the March, 2016 Texas Republican primary, held just after the first draft of this paper was completed. Featuring a highly visible Presidential race, it drew twice as many voters as in 2014—and had contests for three Supreme Court positions, one of which was between Paul Green and Rick Green, two men with common first names and identical last names. It was The Perfect Storm, and our logic implies that this should lead to large ballot order effects. This is immediately evident in the histogram of county vote shares presented in Figure 2(a), without even looking at ballot order: in a race won with 52.1% of the statewide vote, virtually no county’s vote was nearly evenly split. Instead Paul Green’s vote shares are bifurcated into two clusters, one around 40%, and another around 60%, suggesting a ballot order effect approaching twenty percentage points. The regression results in Figure 2(c) confirm this: the coefficient estimate is 19.4 percentage points. We have never seen a ballot order effect this large, and may never again.

Since different counties had different ballot orders, this might not have made a difference in the final result. But with an effect that gigantic, getting even a little bit lucky with the ballot order in the biggest cities might have made the difference.

I’m not sure if there’s a policy answer to this. At the very least, ballot order should always be randomized. Beyond that, Grant suggests that if you’re not sure who to vote for, vote for the person at the bottom of the ballot. They could use the help.

Categories: Politics

Logic Pros Review: Syntronik’s massive collection of classic synth emulations

9to5Mac - 2 hours 50 min ago

IK Multimedia unleashed its brand new Syntronik software synth to the masses recently. The new AU/VST instrument is certainly one of the more impressive offerings from the company in terms of virtual sound sources, so there was no way we weren’t going to give this one a spin. more…

Categories: Misc

Cord-Cutting Still Doesn't Beat the Cable Bundle

Slashdot - 3 hours 3 min ago
I'd like to cut the cord, writes Brian Barrett for Wired, then, the very instant I allow myself to picture what life looks like after that figurative snip, my reverie comes crashing down. From an article: Cutting the cord is absolutely right for some people. Lots of people, maybe. But it's not that cheap, and it's not that easy, and there's not much hope of improvement on either front any time soon. Not to turn this into a math experiment, but let's consider cost. Assuming you're looking for a cord replacement, not abandoning live television altogether, you're going to need a service that bundles together a handful of channels and blips them to your house over the internet. The cheapest way you can accomplish this is to pay Sling TV $20 per month, for which you get 29 channels. That sounds not so bad, and certainly less than your cable bill. But! Sling Orange limits you to a single stream. If you're in a household with others, you'll probably want Sling Blue, which offers multiple streams and 43 channels for $25 per month. But! Sling Orange and Sling Blue have different channel lineups (ESPN is on Orange, not Blue, while Orange lacks FX, Bravo and any locals). For full coverage, you can subscribe to both for $40. But! Have kids? You'll want the Kids Extra package for another $5 per month. Love ESPNU? Grab that $5 per month sports package. HBO? $15 per month, please. Presto, you're up to $65 per month. But! Don't forget the extra $5 for a cloud-based DVR. Plus the high-speed internet service that you need to keep your stream from buffering, which, by the way, it'll do anyway. That's not to pick on Sling TV, specifically. But paying $70 to quit cable feels like smoking a pack of Parliaments to quit Marlboro Lights. You run into similar situations across the board, whether it's a higher base rate, or a limited premium selection, or the absence of local programming altogether. It turns out, oddly enough, that things cost money, whether you access those things through traditional cable packages or through a modem provided to you by a traditional cable operator.

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Categories: Misc